Video transcript: Lindsey Vonn has big goals for low-radar sport

On screen:

Changing black and white imagery associated with wealth and indulgence.

Chase Presents An Uninterrupted Original

[Jay Z’s Dead President III plays]

♪ High school graduates ♪

♪ Straight to the league I ain’t waitin’ for my knee to blow ♪

♪ Yesterday I was needin’ this dough ♪

♪ Get it? I was kneadin’ this dough ♪

Chase and Chase Logo | Uninterrupted

Kneading Dough

Images of slowly spinning silver quarter dollars, switching to a black and white still of Maverick Carter sitting casually in a chair mid speech.

Hosted by Maverick Carter

Maverick Carter sits next to Lindsey Vonn, professional ski racer. The two are sitting in armchairs on a stage. In the background is a fire inside a fireplace. The two are joined by a live audience. Maverick and Lindsey begin their discussion.

Maverick:

Like to welcome you guys to another episode of Kneading Dough. I’m joined by the fantastic and lovely Lindsey Vonn and also, a live audience for the first time, on the episode.

[APPLAUSE]

Maverick:

I wanna start with you growing up—At what point did you realize, skiing is what I’m gonna do?

Lindsey:

Well, so when I met Picabo Street when I was nine, she was my inspiration growing up. And she was the reason why I wanted to be an Olympian. my goal was to make the Olympics in 2002, which I was 17 at the time, or I would be 17. And you know, my dad had always preached to me growing up that, you know, you don’t wanna be a ski bum and so, I kind of always thought of skiing as a platform to something. And I always looked to Picabo, because, at the time, she was so successful. She was the first person to really make good money off of ski racing. And so, I thought, well, if she can do it, I can do it. And so, when I was kind of making my plan to make the Olympics, I went through it with my dad, he said, if you can make the Olympic team and reach these and these goals by, you know, five, 10 years, you could potentially be making, you know, this and this much money.

Maverick:

Oh, wow. So, he had that conversation with you about money?

Lindsey:

Yes.

Maverick:

And how old were you at the time?

Lindsey:

Was like 13, 14.

Maverick:

[LAUGHING]

Lindsey:

We had big, big goals.

Maverick:

He was on it.

Lindsey:

He was on it. I mean, I think I do give my dad a lot of credit. He never pushed me, you know, in that way, when I was growing up, but he definitely made me realize a lot of things.

Maverick:

In team sports, it’s very easy to understand how an athlete gets big. Skiing is a bit different I think. So, for those of us who don’t understand how skiers make money, explain to us, how do you—as a skier, do you get paid? Cause you don’t get paid to go to the Olympics, correct?

Lindsey:

No, no. We—getting paid through ski racing is very, very difficult. It’s a very steep pyramid. If you’re not in the top five or 10 in the world, you’re struggling to not have to get a second job.

Maverick:

Wow.

Lindsey:

We get paid from the International Ski Federation. I believe they change the rule last year. It’s one to 30. So, 30th place get like, a check for 200 dollars.

Maverick:

So like, if you go to the World Cup, the 30th place gets the—so that’s how they pay you.

Lindsey:

This is not like golf or tennis, okay?

Maverick:

Yes, exactly.

Lindsey:

There’s no six figure checks coming our way—normally, it’s about 30,000 dollars before taxes. And usually, we’re in another country, so we’re taxed from, you know, Austria or Switzerland or wherever and then taxed again from the U.S. So, really, it’s nothing.

Maverick:

Got it. And so, for you, it sounds like, for you, making money is all about endorsements and sponsorships.

Lindsey:

Exactly. And that’s where I give my dad a lot of credit, because I did think about that and I always have kind of thought of how I can—how I can transcend sport. So, I look at companies that fit my personality. I look at companies that I wanna have a long-term relationship with, companies like Under Armour, Red Bull, Rolex. You know, Rolex was one of—I think, for me personally, the most gratifying sponsor to have, because I wasn’t necessarily getting paid a lot, but that represented something so much more. Under Armour, I was—I’m the longest standing Under Armour athlete, currently, and it’s been like 11 years now.

Maverick:

As you’ve now been skiing and doing this for a while, is there any advice or—about money or about business that you would give your younger self, like watch out for this or do this or don’t do that?

Lindsey:

Maybe don’t get married.

[LAUGHING]

Maverick:

How old were you when you got married?

Lindsey:

That was a great one. Live audience. This is what it’s for, right?

Maverick:

Exactly, exactly, exactly.

Lindsey:

I was married at 22.

Maverick:

That’s good advice for anyone in here not married and young. You got that advice for free.

Lindsey:

Forewarned. You’re forewarned.

Maverick:

Exactly. You’re forewarned. And when it comes to money, we all have things that we love to buy as like a guilty pleasure. What is yours, what thing that you love to splurge on?

Lindsey:

I’m very frugal, but I kind of—Louis Vuitton is my—I have a problem.

Maverick:

Really?

Lindsey:

It’s my initials.

Maverick:

That is a good point. I did not think about that. It is—

Lindsey:

So, it’s like everything is made for me.

Maverick:

Yeah, exactly. You have to have everything.

Lindsey:

I know.

Maverick:

So, a topic we’ve discussed on Kneading Dough before with other female guests is the wage gap in sports, and specifically their sport. Is there a wage gap in skiing? Do men make a lot more than women or is it not that in skiing?

Lindsey:

The prize money for races is the same, which is very minimum, but I mean, everyone talks. You know, all of our contracts are confidential, but I roughly know how much the men make and how much the women make. It is a pretty severe gap—but I’m hoping I can get women in ski racing more publicity and give them the push and the platform that they need to make more money.

Maverick:

And for you, how important is it for you to also break all the records, men and women, and be the winningest skier of all time?

Lindsey:

It’s very important. Like, I literally am not gonna stop skiing until like, I’ve reached that mark, because I don’t like being the best female. I really don’t. I wanna be the best of all time, period. And for me just to have that record would solidify my career. And then I can say I’m the greatest, and I don’t need to say female or American. You know, it’s—it really bothers me. They’re like, oh, you’re the best American. I’m like, no. That’s not it.

Maverick:

[LAUGHING] exactly. Well, I think you will. I think you’ll break all the records and be the greatest skier of all time.

Lindsey:

Thank you.

Maverick:

A great way to end it. Thanks again for joining us on Kneading Dough, and thanks to our live audience.

[APPLAUSE]

[MUSIC PLAYING]

On screen:

Chase and Chase Logo | Uninterrupted

Kneading Dough