Video transcript: Chase and UNINTERRUPTED with Serena Williams

Description:

Jay Z's Dead Presidents III plays under opening title sequence.

On screen:

Text read "Chase Presents"

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Changing black and white imagery associated with wealth and indulgence; a marble Greek figurine.

On screen:

Text read "An Uninterrupted Original"

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More black and white images of martini glasses, Benjamin Franklin, city landscape at night, a private jet, a fancy watch.

On screen:

Text read "Chase x Uninterrupted: Kneading Dough"

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Images of slowly spinning silver quarter dollars, switching to a black and white still of Maverick Carter sitting casually in a chair mid speech.

On screen:

Text read "Hosted by Maverick Carter"

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Graphics transition into Maverick Carter and Serena Williams interview. The two are sat in plush armchairs in a bright and airy living room space; a large 2 window with palm trees is visible beyond the two. The camera focuses and the two begin their discussion.

On screen:

UN x Chase graphic top left.

Maverick Carter:

To start out you just started playing tennis because you loved to play tennis, didn't even think about this is gonna financially change my life, I just love the sport.

On screen:

Text read "Serena Williams // 23 Grand Slam Singles Titles"

Serena Williams:

Yeah, I've actually never played for money, I just thought you would go out there and you would hold a trophy, not once did I think about a check. In fact, when I first turned pro, you would, you had to go pick up your check from the...

Maverick Carter:

You'd win and you'd have to go to the office, money wasn't wired to you?

Serena Williams:

Yes. No, not back then, I never, never picked it up. So, at the end of the year the tournament directors would
literally hand me the check 'cause I would never go get it. I just played for the love of the sport.

Maverick Carter:

Was there anything after winning that open and getting that Grand Slam, did you notice anything change for you or more doors open for you after that?

Serena Williams:

I started getting more endorsement opportunities, you know and talk shows and stuff like that, that I had never
before. It was completely different and ever since then, it's just been a part of my life.

Maverick Carter:

That first...The U.S. Open win obviously empowered you to become to who we now know as Serena...when did you learn about money, when did you learn, like, "I do have to deal with this?"

Serena Williams:

Well very early, early on I learned a lot about money. I learned that, well my dad was always so hands-on with me...it was interesting he said, "I'll never, never take any money from you like a fee or anything, but I'm also not gonna direct you into what you spend and what you don't spend, it's gonna be your decision." From since I was a teenager, I've made every financial decision in my life and I've had to learn how to make good ones and how to make bad ones, which I think helps you make better ones.

Maverick Carter:

And in growing up, did you struggle growing up, did you have money...

Serena Williams:

I never ever, ever felt broke. Looking back (laughter), I'm like, "Wow, we lived in a two-bedroom house with seven people." (wow) You know, looking back I was like, you know, "Wow." I don't know how my parents were able to make me feel that way, but they did and that was really something, really special, so I never felt, when I came into money, that I needed to go buy this 'cause I never wanted anything. So it was, it was a great way.

Maverick Carter:

What was that feeling like when you got that first million-dollar check?

Serena Williams:

I never touched it.

Maverick Carter:

Never touched it?

Serena Williams:

Never touched it. I just put it in the bank and I remember I went through the drive-thru to deposit my check and then they were like, "I think you need to come in for this." And so, I ended up going inside and then, because I already had an account so I was just like, just, just put it in my account.

Maverick Carter:

But did you stare at it for a little while?

Serena Williams:

I should've took a picture of it, but cell phones did exist then...

Maverick Carter:

You and Venus also talked and it was interesting to me and it kinda led the charge on the men vs the women pay thing...

Serena Williams:

You sacrifice so much, just as much as the guy next to me that's training every day, but he gets to be paid more and how do you explain that So, Venus and I definitely, do a lot of work and so at the Grand Slams it's definitely equal, other tournaments it's almost there, which is fine too, we're getting there. But it's work in progress and we've continued to fight the good fight.

Maverick Carter:

As you looked what am I gonna do off the court was there a blueprint or someone you saw that you were like that's kinda how I want my thing, my business off the court to work?

Serena Williams:

Well, honestly, the only person I really wanted to be like was Billie Jean King 'cause I felt like she did so much for
demanding equal prize money which is why, the only reason why the US Open was the only Grand Slam that paid equal prize money was because of her and, you know, 13 other women that got together and they, they said, "No, we want equal prize money." I always forget the titles that she has, that she won like 13 Grand Slam titles and she was an amazing player, because she did so much more than that...so she was someone that I always looked up to and, if I can even come close to that, I would just, I wouldn't even think of, I would ever be on that level, but if I could just go in that pathway is what I've always wanted to do.

Maverick Carter:

You're one of greatest athletes to ever walk the earth, you know right up there with the likes of Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, Muhammed Ali, Lebron James...does that competitiveness transform off the court too?

Serena Williams:

Absolutely. Just for sheer will of wanting to be equal. Because if I were a man and my name was Serin Williams, you know, it would be maybe a different story. Honestly at the end of the day, I feel like if I'm able to open the door for the next person, that means a lot for me too and hopefully they'll be able to do better than me. Not everyone has that opportunity and I really am happy that I have that opportunity.

Maverick Carter:

If you were to have a—a young daughter and she was to go on to be an athlete, whether it be tennis or anything, what would success look like for you in the future as far as equal pay or payment for women versus men?

Serena Williams:

If my daughter were to play in a sport and she was able to have, you know, equal prize money or equal pay or equal—equal rights, I feel like that would be a success too. And if not, I really want her to speak up for it—well, any daughter of mine will have a voice.

Maverick Carter:

But have you started to think about things that you want your child to learn that you didn't learn at a young age that you—that you've now been able to learn that you will teach your child?

Serena Williams:

Honestly, if my kid can grow up exactly how I did, I couldn't be happier. I would love to give to my kid, the values that my parents gave me, but I think that's most important, and I think everything comes after that, you know, I think it really starts with just building a great human being (absolutely), create a spiritual background and, honestly, I couldn't want anything more than that, what I had, for my child.

Description:

Jay Z's Dead Presidents track III fades up.

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Interview fades to closing graphic sequence as music continues to play under.

On screen:

Text reads "Uninterrupted x Chase Kneading Dough."

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Music fades out.